Jordan

Jordan

Jordan's economy is among the smallest in the Middle East. King ABDALLAH, during the first decade of the 2000s, implemented significant economic reforms, such as expanding foreign trade and privatising state-owned companies that attracted foreign investment and contributed to average annual economic growth of 8% for 2004 through 2008.
 
The global economic slowdown and regional turmoil contributed to slower growth from 2010 to 2017 - with growth averaging about 2.5% per year - and hurt export-oriented sectors, construction/real estate, and tourism. Since the onset of the civil war in Syria and resulting refugee crisis, one of Jordan’s most pressing socioeconomic challenges has been managing the influx of approximately 660,000 UN-registered refugees, more than 80% of whom live in Jordan’s urban areas. Jordan’s own official census estimated the refugee number at 1.3 million Syrians as of early 2016.

 

Jordan is an Arab Muslim country, located in the north of the Arabian Peninsula and in West Asia. Bordered by Syria to the north, Iraq to the east, Saudi Arabia to the south and south-east, and Palestine (the West Bank) to the west. Jordan is named to the Jordan River, which passes on its western border, and Amman is capital. Jordan is a land steeped in history. It has been home to some of mankind's earliest settlements and villages, and relics of many of the worlds great civilisations can still be seen today. As the crossroads of the Middle East, the lands of Jordan and Palestine have served as a strategic nexus connecting Asia, Africa, and Europe. Thus, since the dawn of civilization, Jordan's geography has given it an important role to play as a conduit for trade and communications, connecting east and west, north and south. Jordan continues to play this role today.

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